SCF-1V

SCF-1V

FO Converter T&R, 1 Ch Video

SCF-2V

SCF-2V

FO Converter T&R, 2 Ch Video

SCF-4V

SCF-4V

FO Converter T&R, 4 Ch Video

Fiber Optic Converter

A fiber optic converter is a simple networking device that makes it possible to connect two dissimilar media types such as twisted pair with fiber optic cabling. They were introduced to the industry in the 1990s, and are important in interconnecting fiber optic cabling-based systems with existing copper-based, structured cabling systems. They are also used in metropolitan area network (MAN) access and data transport services to enterprise customers.

Fiber optic converters support many different data communication protocols including Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, T1/E1/J1, DS3/E3, as well as multiple cabling types such as coax, twisted pair, multi-mode and single-mode fiber optics. Media converter types range from small standalone devices and PC card converters to high port-density chassis systems that offer many advanced features for network management.

On some devices, Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) enables proactive management of link status, monitoring chassis environmental statistics and sending traps to network managers in the event of a fiber break or even link loss on the copper port.

Fiber media converters can connect different local area network (LAN) media, modifying duplex and speed settings. Switching media converters can connect different speed network segments. When expanding the reach of the LAN to span multiple locations, media converters are useful in connecting multiple LANs to form one large campus area network that spans over a limited geographic area. As premises networks are primarily copper-based, media converters can extend the reach of the LAN over single-mode fiber up to 160 kilometers with 1550 nm optics.